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Prof. Dr. Gesine Stephan

Prof. Dr. Gesine Stephan

Prof. Dr. Gesine Stephan

Chair of Empirical Microeconomics

Curriculum vitae

Gesine Stephan (born in 1965) studied economics at the University of Hanover until 1990. She then worked as a research associate and, after completing her doctoral degree in 1994, as a research fellow at the Institute of Quantitative Economic Research at the University of Hanover, where she went on to work as a senior research fellow after completing her habilitation in 2000. She spent research periods at the universities in Austin and Berkeley, USA, in 1996 and 1997. In 2000, she was a visiting professor of service economics and policy at the University of Trier. She has been head of the research unit ‘Active Labor Market Policies and Integration’ at the Institute for Employment Research (IAB) of the Federal Employment Agency in Nuremberg since April 2004.

Professor Stephan was appointed to the newly established Chair of Empirical Microeconomics at the School of Business and Economics in May 2009. At the IAB she continues to lead the research unit ‘Active Labor Market Policy and Integration’, which focuses on the analysis and evaluation of instruments and programs in labor market policy.

Professor Stephan’s research priorities are labor and personnel economics, labor and social policy, microeconometrics, and evaluation of labor market policies.

2017

2016

2017

2016

No publications found.

  • Experimental studies on the impact of collective bargaining on the gender wage gap
    (Third Party Funds Single)
    Term: Dec 1, 2012 - Dec 30, 2015
    Funding source: Bundesministerium für Familie, Senioren, Frauen und Jugend (BMFSFJ)
    URL: http://www.wirtschaftstheorie.wiso.uni-erlangen.de/de/tarifverhandlungen-und-equal-pay/
    The aim of the project is to analyze bargaining processes and their impact on gender wage differentials. In particular, we want to identify potential leverages for a reduction of the remaining gender wage gap under collective bargaining agreements. An important aspect is the gender segregation in pay grades. Whereas men and women are paid equally within grades, the classification of jobs will probably play a crucial role. The research project conducts stylized negotiations to gain insights in wage formation processes. Based on economic experiments, we investigate in particular the following questions: Why and how might a gender wage gap arise from or in spite of collective bargaining? Can the gender wage gap be reduced by increasing transparency?
  • Experimental studies on the impact of collective bargaining on the gender wage gap
    (Third Party Funds Single)
    Term: Dec 1, 2012 - Dec 30, 2015
    Funding source: Bundesministerium für Familie, Senioren, Frauen und Jugend (BMFSFJ)
    URL: http://www.wirtschaftstheorie.wiso.uni-erlangen.de/de/tarifverhandlungen-und-equal-pay/
    The aim of the project is to analyze bargaining processes and their impact on gender wage differentials. In particular, we want to identify potential leverages for a reduction of the remaining gender wage gap under collective bargaining agreements. An important aspect is the gender segregation in pay grades. Whereas men and women are paid equally within grades, the classification of jobs will probably play a crucial role. The research project conducts stylized negotiations to gain insights in wage formation processes. Based on economic experiments, we investigate in particular the following questions: Why and how might a gender wage gap arise from or in spite of collective bargaining? Can the gender wage gap be reduced by increasing transparency?

Prof. Dr. Gesine Stephan