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Prof. Dr. Johannes Rincke

Prof. Dr. Johannes Rincke

Prof. Dr. Johannes Rincke

Chair of Economic Policy

Curriculum vitae

Johannes Rincke (born in 1972) studied economics and Eastern European studies at Freie Universität Berlin. After graduating in 2001, he worked as a research associate at the Research Department ‘Company Taxation and Public Finance’ at the Center for European Economic Research (ZEW) in Mannheim until 2006. From 2003 to 2006, he was also a research associate at the University of Mannheim. He obtained his doctoral degree from the University of Göttingen in 2006.
He then worked as a research associate at the Seminar for Economic Policy at LMU Munich until 2010. In 2008 and 2009, he held positions as a visiting research fellow at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, USA, and Universitat Pompeu Fabra in Barcelona, Spain. Both visits were funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). In 2010, he obtained his habilitation from LMU Munich. Prof. Dr. Johannes Rincke has been Chair of Economic Policy at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) since September 2010.

His research connects topics in the fields of public finance and behavioral economics. He is particularly interested in the design and execution of field experiments on individual compliance decisions (contributions to public goods, tax compliance, corruption, etc.).

2018

2017

2016

2018

2016

No publications found.

No projects found.

  • Taxation, Social Norms, and Compliance: Lessons for Institution Design
    (FAU Funds)
    The goal of the project “Taxation, Social Norms, and Compliance: Lessons for Institution Design” is to foster research on individual and social determinants of tax compliance. In particular, the project aims to investigate the role of institutions and of social and cultural norms for tax compliance as well as its behavioral foundations. With regard to formal institutions, the project considers the design of the tax system as well the role of tax administration and of tax accounting. Further, it also addresses social and cultural norms, which is crucial given that tax compliance depends on norms like fairness as well as on the perceptions of other taxpayers’ adherence to these norms. Finally, the project also includes a specific behavioral component that explores the preferences and the decision process of the individual taxpayer.

Prof. Dr. Johannes Rincke