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Prof. Dr. Tobias Wolbring

Prof. Dr. Tobias Wolbring

Prof. Dr. Tobias Wolbring

Chair of Empirical Economic Sociology

Curriculum vitae

Tobias Wolbring (born in 1982) holds a diploma degree in Sociology (Economics and Social Psychology as minor subjects; 2007) and a Ph.D. degree in Sociology and Economics (summa cum laude; 2013) from Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich. From 2008 to 2013, Wolbring was a research assistant at the chair of Prof. Norman Braun, Ph.D.) at the Institute of Sociology, LMU Munich. In 2013 and 2014 he was a postdoctoral researcher at the Professorship for Social Psychology and Research on Higher Education (Prof. Dr. Hans-Dieter Daniel) at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) Zurich. From 2015 to 2017 he was an Assistant Professor (Juniorprofessor) of Sociology, with a specialization in Longitudinal Data Analysis in the School of Social Sciences at the University of Mannheim. Since 2017 Professor Wolbring holds the Chair of Empirical Economic Sociology at the School of Business and Economics at Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nürnberg. In 2014 Professor Wolbring received the Dissertation Award by the German Sociological Association (GSA) in the same year the Anatol-Rapoport Prize (2014) by the GSA-Section „Model Building and Simulation” and in 2017 the Robert K. Merton Prize (2017) by the International Network of Analytical Sociology. Since 2013 he is co-editor of the SSCI-listed, peer reviewed journal Soziale Welt and council member of the section “Methods of Social Research” of the German Sociological Association.

His research interests include: analytical sociology, economic sociology (with special focus on life satisfaction, Matthew effects, and social status), evaluation of research and teaching (in education and higher education), methods of social research (especially causal inference, DAGs, evaluations, experiments, and longitudinal data analysis), social inequality and discrimination (with special focus on physical characteristics, gender, and social status), and social norms/deviance.

For further information please visit the chair’s website.

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2016

No publications found.

  • A life-course perspective on labor supply: Temporal, institutional, and social embeddedness as determinants of individual reservation wages
    (Third Party Funds Single)
    Term: 1. February 2020 - 31. January 2022
    Funding source: DFG-Einzelförderung / Sachbeihilfe (EIN-SBH)
    Since the Hartz-legislation, the German labour market is
    characterised by an increasing employment rate, a shortage of skilled
    manpower, and a growing low-pay sector. Amplified by demographic
    change, labour supply and especially the reservation wage become
    central for understanding such labour markets. While economic
    research has been investigating the determinants of reservation
    wages and labour supply for quite some time, a sociological
    investigation of this topic is still missing – despite substantial
    theoretical and empirical research gaps. The outlined research project
    aims to close these gaps and to develop a genuinely sociological
    perspective on labour supply based on the life-course approach. In
    particular, the effects of temporal, institutional, and social
    embeddedness on individual reservation wages are the core of the
    project. We develop theoretical models of these three forms of
    embeddedness and test their predictions based on longitudinal data
    of the Panel Study “Labour Market and Social Security” (PASS),
    utilizing advanced methods of causal analysis. The projects puts
    special emphasis on social groups, which – due to precarious life
    situations and the institutional setting – may be forced to lower their
    reservation salary and enter into lower-paid employment
    relationships. By that, we not only close important research gaps in
    our understanding of labour markets, but also contribute to the
    research fields of social inequality and poverty.

No projects found.

Prof. Dr. Tobias Wolbring